Monthly Archives: July 2017

The Peace and Prosperity of the City

Also, seek the peace and prosperity of the city… Pray for the peace of Jerusalem: “May those who love you be secure. May there be peace within your walls and security within your citadels.”

(Jeremiah 29:7, Psalm 122:6-7)

In preparation for the beginning of a new Academic Year of the University, we held a special Prophetic Prayer Walk last Friday 28th July to ransack the enemy that always looms around this gate. The theme was ‘Peace’ – and we enthroned the Wonderful Counselor and Prince of Peace; we prayed for the peace of Kyambogo hill as our Jerusalem, and we are the Temple of the Holy Spirit. The Church is called upon to take her position and continue in prayer as we wait for over 10,000 fresh students joining first year in a week’s time, as well as more continuing students reporting soon. Many forces of darkness are lurking and competing for these souls, hence the necessity of our fervent prayers and readiness for mentorship and discipleship. Prophet Jeremiah and King David give us inspiration and encouragement to pray for our city – the opening Scriptures above are actively calling us to action today.

Meanwhile, it is time to build! Kakumba Chapel has embarked on the vertical extension of the Chapel Hall to create more working space and the Musiime Hall – a multi-purpose Hall which will majorly be used as a Teens’ Chapel, and also for fellowships, meetings, parties, short courses and University lectures and exams. The motivation of these physical development actions is the Gospel; we want the good news of Jesus Christ to reach more and deeper, and to equip more people to go and proclaim the same. The gospel liberates and gives life and light. Our teens need deliberate focus; they are in transition from being children to becoming adults, and are many times lost in between; yet they face potentially confusing circumstances both from internal changes happening in their bodies and from external influence by peers real and virtual. Listen to the progress update and seize your opportunity to participate in this noble cause of building.

Along the ‘Reconciliation’ series, today’s sermon is on ‘Forgiveness’, which is necessary if ever reconciliation is to be achieved – whether with friends, in family, at the workplace, or even in the Church. Forgiveness is also necessary among different sections of staff and stakeholders in the University for peace and prosperity to prevail. Indeed, as we pray for peace, we must call upon God to soften hearts of men and women to find the sweet treasures in the virtues of mercy and forgiveness. I call upon you to support the physical prosperity and peace through your generous contribution to the building project at hand – the Musiime Hall Project, to cost us Ugx 300 million. Secondly, pray for the staff and community of Kyambogo, especially the leaders and Gospel ministers; and pray for the students starting and continuing their studies here that they will find wisdom, which starts with the fear of the Lord.

 

 

 

Pray for us

“Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful. And pray for us, too, that God may open a door for our message, so that we may proclaim the mystery of Christ, for which I am in chains.” (Col 4:2-3)

It is time to build. Kakumba Chapel has started a vertical extension of the Chapel Hall to create more working space and a multi-purpose Hall which will majorly be used as a Teens’ Chapel, and also for fellowships, meetings, small parties, short courses and University lectures and exams. The motivation of these physical development actions is the Gospel; we want the good news of Jesus Christ to reach more and deeper, and to equip more people to go and proclaim the same. The gospel liberates and gives life and light. Our teens need deliberate focus; they are in transition from being children to becoming adults, and are many times lost in between; yet they face many potentially confusing circumstances both from internal changes happening in their bodies and from external influence by peers real in virtual. ‘Your Gospel O Lord is the hope for our nation – You are the Lord!’

One characteristic of Apostle Paul is the consistent burden for the Gospel. It was the reason for his conversion; it was the reason for his rejoicing and the reason for his suffering; it was the reason for his preaching and the reason for his writing; it was the reason for his sweet words and the reason for his harsh tones; it was the reason for his living and the reason for his death. The Gospel was a burden never to be lifted from the heart of Paul. In today’s key Scripture, Paul admonishes the Colossians to be devoted in prayer as part of the rules for Christian life; but when it comes to personal prayer requests, he immediately manifests that burden – ‘that God may open a door for our message’ – even after his first, second and third missionary journeys through which he preached in all Turkey and Greece, planting numerous Churches and encouraging believers to the faith, Paul still calls for prayers ‘that God may open a door for our message’!

In his letter to the Colossians, Paul’s main objective is to attack heresy (false teaching) that was creeping into the Church; it taught more ceremonialism and dependence on secret knowledge and reliance on human wisdom and traditions, which are empty! Paul attacks this heresy by exalting Jesus Christ and showing Him as supreme and completely adequate. He then follows up with pastoral teachings calling the believers to holy living, and ends with personal greetings, writing about his friends and partners in ministry in such cordial language. In all this, his burden for the Gospel is the driver.

I call upon you to act in two ways today: support financially the building project at hand – the Musiime Hall Project to cost us Ugx. 300 million; give what you have and let the Lord use it for the cause of the Gospel. Secondly, pray for leaders who are ambassadors of the Gospel – if Paul could ask for prayers, how much more your Bishop and your Chaplain and your fellowship leader? Pray for us.

 

The Lord is my Shepherd – Psalm 23

“You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.” (Psalm 23:5)

The Lord has the power not only to feed and comfort but also to protect – so that the disciple will enjoy peace and satisfaction even in the presence of enemies. The anointing on the head signifies a warm welcome into a fellowship of abundance of materials blessings, goodness and mercy. Such disposition of great assurance is the need of the man that once said, ‘as the deer pants for the waters, so my soul longs after you…’ The Lord receives glory and honour and worship as the psalmist takes pleasure in the provisions and peace received and assured for a lifetime. The twenty-third Psalm is such a sweet song that lingers on the memory of many a Christian.

At this point in the year, I celebrate victories that are answers to earnest prayers: a mother is holding their very first baby after a 5-year wait in marriage, while another is her last trimester of the first successful pregnancy in 7 years of marriage with a few painful miscarriages. These breakthroughs bring tears of joy, and long-standing questions dissolve into simple praise to the Lord of life. ‘He restores my soul’. On the other hand, I remember a mother’s pain – a prodigal son was only wandering further and further away until I prayed that a troublesome injury would ground him for a time in order that he would reflect on his life and repent. Six months down the road, he is yet to reach that valley of repentance, but at least he is back home with a jaw-injury that grounded him for a time. He hides in a blame-game bravado to conceal his shame, and still behaves elusive; but that the mother has had the opportunity of seeing her son for a time is a source of hope that God is at work, and He answers prayers. More prayers are needed for this returning son!

A dear friend lost her Dad after a short illness. I had opportunity to pray for him on his death bed; as I read the Psalm, his wife clearly recited it from memory. The valley of the shadow of death was right there, and the anointing on the head was relevant. When he was gone, I had opportunity to visit the bereaved family and to attend the funeral. It was not time to say much, but to simply be present and provide a shoulder to cry on, and be counted among those that stood with them in this difficult time. But more so, our presence was in part announcing the presence of the Lord who is ever present, even in times of trouble – I read Psalm 46 for them at some point.

The journey of life goes through the different turns; no matter where you find yourself – in celebration or in gloom or even in confusion – find strength to sing to the Lord and receive assurance of His presence, care, provision and protection.
“The LORD is my shepherd, I shall not want; he makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters; he restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake. Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I fear no evil; for You are with me; your rod and staff staff, they comfort me. You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies; you anoint my head with oil, my cup overflows. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life; and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD forever.”

Sanctify them through thy truth – John 17:17

It is not uncommon to find a Christian who was once fervent and committed growing cold because of a change in schedules. From college to the field, or from a familiar church to a strange fellowship, or even from a regular job to business – some situations seem to take a toll on the discipline of some Christians, especially the regular prayer and meditation on the Word of God. I took leave recently and immediately plunged into such business schedules with a week-long meeting  reviewing technical designs with visitors from India for a project in Karuma. Even there, there was opportunity to encourage Christians and explain how I juggle Engineering and Ministry.

I have chosen to share a devotion by Charles H. Spurgeon to emphasize the importance of the Christian discipline, no matter what the schedules of our lives. We are faced with many beckoning voices to turn away from our Saviour and Lord, and we constantly need to be sanctified until we enter the eternal destiny.

Sanctification begins in regeneration. The Spirit of God infuses into man that new living principle by which he becomes “a new creature” in Christ Jesus. This work, which begins in the new birth, is carried on in two ways: mortification, whereby the lusts of the flesh are subdued and kept under; and vivification, by which the life which God has put within us is made to be a well of water springing up unto everlasting life.

This is carried on every day in what is called “perseverance”, by which the Christian is preserved and continued in a gracious state, and is made to abound in good works unto the praise and glory of God; and it culminates or comes to perfection, in “glory”, when the soul, being thoroughly purged, is caught up to dwell with holy beings at the right hand of the Majesty on high.

But while the Spirit of God is thus the author of sanctification, yet there is a visible agency employed which must not be forgotten. “Sanctify them,” said Jesus, “through thy truth: thy word is truth.” The passages of Scripture which prove that the instrument of our sanctification is the Word of God are very many. The Spirit of God brings to our minds the precepts and doctrines of truth, and applies them with power. These are heard in the ear, and being received in the heart, they work in us to will and to do of God’s good pleasure.

The truth is the sanctifier, and if we do not hear or read the truth, we shall not grow in sanctification. We only progress in sound living as we progress in sound understanding. “Thy word is a lamp unto my feet and a light unto my path.” Do not say of any error, “It is a mere matter of opinion.” No man indulges an error of judgment, without sooner or later tolerating an error in practice. Hold fast the truth, for by so holding the truth shall you be sanctified by the Spirit of God.

God bless you.